Planned Giving - Define Your Legacy and Make a Difference!

Planned Giving

With thoughtful planning, anyone can provide for their financial goals and help Jacksonville University continue to be an extraordinary place to learn. Planning may allow you to:
  • Benefit family and friends while providing for the university that is important to you
  • Leave a personal legacy that reflects your values and beliefs
  • Take advantage of possible tax benefits
  • Receive the satisfaction of giving back in a meaningful way
Legacy gifts take many forms, and reasons to include JU in one's financial and estate plan are as unique as each individual, but they share a single purpose: to ensure that Jacksonville University will prosper in the future.

We appreciate the continued commitment of alumni and friends to JU students and thank them for all they do to make our good work possible. We would be honored to assist you, too. JU's success depends on your vision and generosity.
How to Make a Difference at JU
You want to make a difference at JU, but don't know where to begin? Identify your goals and review possible strategies to achieve them.
Read More...
Plan Your Gift At Any Age
Simple Planning Tips to protect your family and support JU too!
Read More...

 

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Thursday October 23, 2014

Washington News

Washington Hotline

U.S. Tax Receipts Up 8.9%

For the 2014 fiscal year that concluded on September 30, U.S. tax revenue grew by 8.9% to $3.02 trillion.

This was $247 billion more in tax revenue than the federal government received in 2013. With spending growth of 1% and an 8.9% increase in tax revenue, the deficit declined to $483 billion.

The 2014 deficit was 2.8% of gross domestic product (GDP). Federal revenue grew from 16.7% of the economy in 2013 to 17.5% by 2014. However, even with a lower deficit the national debt will increase to about $18 trillion by December of 2014.

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew explained that the reduced deficit was “due to a combination of higher receipts and stable outlays” during 2014. The prime increase in tax revenue came from increasing the top individual tax rate to 39.6%, the top capital gain rate to 23.8% and from growth of corporate tax payments.

The tax receipts for fiscal year 2014 increased in almost all categories.

CategoryRevenue (Billions)
Individual Income Tax $1,395B
Corporate Income Tax 321B
Social Security/Medicare Tax 1,024B
Excise Tax 93B
Estate/Gift Tax 19B
Customs Duties 34B
Miscellaneous Tax 135B
Total $3,021B

Editor’s Note: There will be an adjustment in the 2014 deficit numbers. During the November lame duck session, Congress will consider the 53 tax extenders such as the IRA charitable rollover. These are very likely to be passed and made retroactive to January 1. Part of the $25 billion in cost for the tax extenders will be an adjustment for the 2014 deficit number.

Published October 17, 2014
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